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Thread: Why I shed bikini for Niqab

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    Administrator _knownothing_'s Avatar
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    Default Why I shed bikini for Niqab

    Why I shed bikini for Niqab

    By Sara Bokker (a former actress/model/fitness instructor and activist)

    I AM an American woman who was born in the midst of America's "Heartland." I grew up, just like any other girl, being fixated with the glamour of life in "the big city." Eventually, I moved to Florida and on to South Beach of Miami, a hotspot for those seeking the "glamorous life." Naturally, I did what most average Western girls do. I focused on my appearance and appeal, basing my self-worth on how much attention I got from others. I worked out religiously and became a personal trainer, acquired an upscale waterfront residence, became a regular "exhibiting" beach-goer and was able to attain a "living-in-style" kind of life.

    Years went by, only to realize that my scale of self-fulfillment and happiness slid down the more I progressed in my "feminine appeal." I was a slave to fashion. I was a hostage to my looks.

    As the gap continued to progressively widen between my self-fulfillment and lifestyle, I sought refuge in escapes from alcohol and parties to meditation, activism, and alternative religions, only to have the little gap widen to what seemed like a valley. I eventually realized it all was merely a pain killer rather than an effective remedy.

    By now it was Sept. 11, 2001. As I witnessed the ensuing barrage on Islam, Islamic values and culture, and the infamous declaration of the "new crusade," I started to notice something called Islam. Up until that point, all I had associated with Islam was women covered in "tents," wife beaters, harems, and a world of terrorism. As a feminist libertarian, and an activist, I was pursuing a better world for all.

    One day I came across a book that is negatively stereotyped in the West The Noble Qur'an. I was first attracted by the style and approach of the Qur'an, and then intrigued by its outlook on existence, life, creation, and the relationship between Creator and creation. I found the Qur'an to be a very insightful address to heart and soul without the need for an interpreter or pastor.

    Eventually I hit a moment of truth: my new-found self-fulfilling activism was nothing more than merely embracing a faith called Islam where I could live in peace as a "functional" Muslim.

    I bought a beautiful long gown and head cover resembling the Muslim woman's dress code and I walked down the same streets and neighborhoods where only days earlier I had walked in my shorts, bikini, or "elegant" Western business attire.

    Although the people, the faces, and the shops were all the same, one thing was remarkably distinct I was not nor was the peace at being a woman I experienced for the very first time. I felt as if the chains had been broken and I was finally free. I was delighted with the new looks of wonder on people's faces in place of the looks of a hunter watching his prey I had once sought. Suddenly a weight had been lifted off my shoulders. Finally, I was free.

    Of all places, I found my Islam at the heart of what some call "the most scandalous place on earth," which makes it all the more dear and special.
    While content with Hijab I became curious about Niqab, seeing an increasing number of Muslim women in it. I asked my Muslim husband, whom I married after I reverted to Islam, whether I should wear Niqab or just settle for the Hijab I was already wearing. My husband simply advised me that he believes Hijab is mandatory in Islam while Niqab is not. At the time, my Hijab consisted of head scarf that covered all my hair except for my face, and a loose long black gown called "Abaya" that covered all my body from neck to toe.

    A year-and-a-half passed, and I told my husband I wanted to wear Niqab. My reason, this time, was that I felt it would be more pleasing to Allah, the Creator, increasing my feeling of peace at being more modest.
    He supported my decision and took me to buy an "Isdaal," a loose black gown that covers from head to toe, and Niqab, which covers all my head and face except for my eyes. Soon enough, news started breaking about politicians, Vatican clergymen, libertarians, and so-called human rights and freedom activists condemning Hijab at times, and Niqab at others as being oppressive to women, an obstacle to social integration, and more recently, as an Egyptian official called it "a sign of backwardness."

    I find it to be a blatant hypocrisy when Western governments and so-called human rights groups rush to defend woman's rights when some governments impose a certain dress code on women, yet such "freedom fighters" look the other way when women are being deprived of their rights, work, and education just because they choose to exercise their right to wear Niqab or Hijab.

    Today I am still a feminist, but a Muslim feminist, who calls on Muslim women to assume their responsibilities in providing all the support they can for their husbands to be good Muslims. To raise their children as upright Muslims so they may be beacons of light for all humanity once again. To enjoin good any good and to forbid evil any evil. To speak righteousness and to speak up against all ills. To fight for our right to wear Niqab or Hijab and to please our Creator whichever way we chose. But just as importantly to carry our experience with Niqab or Hijab to fellow women who may never have had such a chance.

    Most of the women I know wearing Niqab are Western reverts, some of whom are not even married. Others wear Niqab without full support of either family or surroundings. What we all have in common is that it is the personal choice of each and every one of us, which none of us is willing to surrender.

    Willingly or unwillingly, women are bombarded with styles of "dressing-in-little-to-nothing" virtually in every means of communication everywhere in the world.

    As an ex non-Muslim, I insist on women's right to equally know about Hijab, its virtues, and the peace and happiness it brings to a woman's life as it did to mine. Yesterday, the bikini was the symbol of my liberty, when in actuality it only liberated me from my spirituality and true value as a respectable human being.

    Today, Niqab is the new symbol of woman's liberation.
    To women who surrender to the ugly stereotype against the Islamic modesty of Hijab, I say: You don't know what you are missing.

    Sara Bokker is a former actress/model/fitness instructor and activist.
    میں نےجو کیا وہ برا کیا،میں نے خود کو خود ہی تباہ کیا

    جو تجھے پسند ہو میرے رب،مجھے اس ادا کی تلاش ہے

    http://www.123muslim.com/discussion-...d-arround.html

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    Sister has reemphasized the truth.

    Jazakkallahu Khairan

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    Super Moderator afzaluddin's Avatar
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    JazakAllah nice post sis....................
    Ye sab Tumhara karam hai Aqqa ki baat ab tak bani hui hai

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    Administrator Naqshbandi's Avatar
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    To women who surrender to the ugly stereotype against the Islamic modesty of Hijab, I say: You don't know what you are missing.
    Hadrat Anas Radi ALLAH Taala Anhu reported that the Messenger of Allah Peace And Blessings Be Upon Him has said, “Everything has a heart, and the heart of the Qur’an is Yasin. Allah records anyone who recites Yasin as having recited the Qur’an ten times.”
    [Sunan Tirmidhi, Vol 2, Page 116 - Sunan Daarimi, Vol 2, Page 336]

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    Regular Members rainbow's Avatar
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    SUBHANALLAH its only ALLAH TALA who can give hadayat to whoever he wants from where they may be who imagined soemone like this would become a muslim its all ALLAH TALA rehmat and karam on her may ALLAH bless her AMEEN
    “The soul would have no rainbow had the eyes no tears.”

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    Administrator _knownothing_'s Avatar
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    ^ameen suma ameen

    thanks every one for ur comments
    میں نےجو کیا وہ برا کیا،میں نے خود کو خود ہی تباہ کیا

    جو تجھے پسند ہو میرے رب،مجھے اس ادا کی تلاش ہے

    http://www.123muslim.com/discussion-...d-arround.html

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    may allaha bless every women and girl

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    Super Moderator Altaf Sultani's Avatar
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    "its only ALLAH TALA who can give hadayat to whoever he wants "..very true...subhan Allah
    Haiderium Qalandram Mastam
    Banda e Murtaza Ali Hastam
    Peshwa e tamam Rindanam
    Ke Sag e Koo e Sher e Yazdanam

    also visit www.aulia-e-hind.com for shrines across world

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    jazakallah nice post sis

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